Money is a strange thing. 

 

For some it can be a tool for good, for others a necessary evil. 

 

For many of us, I’ve found that it’s a little bit of both.  Recently I was asked to do a lecture on intertwining money with our values and life’s purpose.   (See last month's blog for more on that). 

 

After the lecture, some of the comments from the audeince made me think more about money and day-to-day decisions. 

 

Deciding what to do with our money at times can be easy: I want those shoes, I buy them.  I’m too tired to cook, we eat out.  But sometimes deciding what to do with our money can be painfully difficult. Other times, the decisions may come easily but the repercussions are painfully difficult. (Have you ever had one of those?)

 

And as a result, choosing what we should do, or need to do isn’t always the easy when considering what we want to do.  (Can I get an Amen on that!?!)  Because of this, I wanted to accompany Pam’s wonderful write-up about strength with my own interjection that money decisions can be hard.  And some of them should be hard.  Doing what’s best (or what we THINK is best) for ourselves right now, may not be what’s best in the long run. 

 

Have you ever decided not to spend money on something only to regret that you didn’t down the road?  (For example: insurance and estate planning.)

 

Have you ever decided not to save money because the item right in front of you felt more important at the time than the idea of building future financial freedom? 

 

It’s never too late to start changing what you do.  And if, after you’ve read Pam’s article, you’re still not sure how to stick to a financial change that deep inside you know you need to make but are finding it hard to…. let me know. Financial life hacks have become a new hobby for me and I’d love to help!